Opioid Addiction

What You Need to Know
Facts and Information About Opioids
Understanding Opioid Use Disorders
From SAMSHA

The underlying causes of opioid use disorders are often misunderstood.  Chronic Pain, emergency pain, and genetic factors all can play a role in understanding how a patient develops an opioid use disorder

Examining Our Biases About People Who Misuse Opioids

The video underscores the importance of examining our misconceptions about people with substance use disorders. To learn more about preventing opioid misuse, overdose, and other substance-related problems, visit samhsa.gov/capt.

Opioid Addiction


  • Opiate Addiction
    Opiate Addiction

    Opiate drugs or opioids are painkilling and narcotic drugs that are made with a base of opium. They affect the body’s mood and sensory systems causing euphoria and numbness. Common drugs in this category are Heroin, OxyContin, Hydrocodone, Lortab, Percocet and Norco. Addictions develop quickly and are usually severe. Medication is usually necessary to combat withdrawal symptoms during detox.

    Opiate Withdrawal Symptoms

    Opiate withdrawal symptoms are usually severe and can last anywhere from a few hours to a few weeks depending on the length of the drug abuse. Even after acute symptoms go away, mental and physical discomfort can last for varied lengths of time. Opiate addictions are very difficult to beat and medical assistance is recommended for your best chance at success. Common symptoms include:

    • Drug Cravings
    • Large Pupils
    • Chills and Goose Bumps
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Body Aches
    • Severe Negative Moods and Agitation

Heroin Addiction


  • The back of a man with his head bowed, thinking, outdoors in a city
    Heroin Addiction

    Heroin is an addictive illicit chemical produced using morphine and is a psychoactive (mind-adjusting) substance taken from the seed of the opium plant. Heroin's appearance comes from what it might be blended in with. It very well may be white or earthy colored powder, or a dark, clingy substance called "dark tar heroin."

    Heroin is a part of a class of medications called narcotics.

    Heroin deaths have drastically expanded throughout the most recent decade. This expansion is identified with the developing number of individuals abusing pain-relieving opioids like OxyContin and Vicodin. A few people who become dependent on those medications change to heroin since it produces comparative impacts however is less expensive and simpler to get.

    Truth be told, the vast majority who use heroin report they previously abused remedy narcotics, however, there are some individuals who change to heroin. The amount of individuals abusing doctor prescribed medications is high to such an extent, that even a little rate means a huge number of heroin users.1 Even along these lines, some exploration proposes around 33% of heroin clients in treatment basically began with heroin. Perhaps they were erroneously informed that just one user can't prompt fixation. Both heroin and narcotic pill use can prompt dependence and overdose.

    How Heroin is Used

    Heroin is blended in with water and infused with a needle. It can likewise be sniffed, smoked, or grunted. Individuals who use heroin here and there join it with different medications, for example, liquor or cocaine (a "speedball"), which can be especially hazardous and raise the danger of overdose.

    Signs of a possible heroin overdose are:

    • slow breathing
    • blue lips and fingernails
    • cold damp skin
    • shaking
    • vomiting or gurgling noise

    Indeed, heroin can be extremely addictive. In 2016, around 626,000 in the U.S. had a heroin use issue. That implies they had difficult issues with the medication, including medical problems, incapacity, and issues meeting obligations at work, school, or home. Of the individuals with heroin use issue in 2016, just 1,000 were teenagers (ages 12 to 17) and 152,000 were youthful grown-ups (ages 18 to 25).3 This proposes once youngsters venture out from home or secondary school, they are bound to begin utilizing heroin.

    Heroin enters the mind rapidly, causing a quick, extreme high. Utilizing heroin over and again can make individuals create resistance to the medication. This implies they have to take increasingly more of it to get a similar impact. In the end they may need to continue taking the medication just to feel typical. For the individuals who use heroin again and again, fixation is almost certain. When an individual gets dependent on heroin, looking for and utilizing the medication frequently turns into the fundamental objective directing their day by day conduct.

    At the point when somebody is dependent on heroin and quits utilizing it, the individual in question may encounter incredibly awkward and excruciating withdrawal indications, which is the reason it is so difficult to stop. Those side effects ordinarily include:

    muscle and bone torment

    cold flashes with chills

    hurling

    stomach issues such as diarrhea

    sleeplessness

    eagerness

    Heroin Cravings

    Luckily, treatment can enable a dependent individual to quit utilizing and remain off heroin. Meds, including buprenorphine and methadone, can help with yearnings that happen subsequent to stopping, helping an individual to assume responsibility for their wellbeing and their lives.

    There are additionally prescriptions being created to help with the withdrawal procedure. The FDA endorsed lofexidine, a non-narcotic

Narcotic Addiction


  • Narcotic Addiction
    Narcotic Addiction

    Narcotics are depressants that affect mood and behavior by causing feelings of euphoria and numbness. Some narcotics are Heroin, OxyContin, Hydrocodone, Lortab and Percocet. Addiction is caused when the body develops a physical dependency to the opiate. When opiate drugs are abruptly stopped, the body panics and withdrawal symptoms develop.

    Narcotic Withdrawal Symptoms

    Narcotic withdrawal symptoms are usually severe and can last anywhere from a few hours to a few weeks depending to the length of the addiction. Even after initial severe symptoms go away, minor physical and mental discomfort can last for long afterwards. Quitting narcotics is difficult and is most effective when done with the help of medication. Common withdrawal symptoms from narcotic addiction are:

    • Drug Cravings
    • Large Pupils
    • Chills and Goose Bumps
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Body Aches
    • Severe Negative Moods and Agitation

Painkiller Addiction


  • Man in a checkered shirt covering his face with tattooed hands
    Painkiller Addiction

    Prescription Painkiller addiction is an easy addiction to form and can be very difficult to break. These drugs affect virtually all systems in our body and trigger mood and “reward” behaviors. Addiction occurs when people develop a dependency on the opiate found in these drugs. Long-term abuse actually causes physical changes to the brain and alters the chemicals you produce. When the supply is abruptly cut off, the body panics and withdrawal symptoms occur. Our approach drastically reduces the typical withdrawal symptoms by using specialized addiction medicines like Suboxone.

    Painkiller Withdrawal Symptoms

    Opioid withdrawal can last anywhere from several hours to several weeks depending on the length of the abuse. Symptoms can be acute and severe. Even after the severe symptoms subside, some physical and mental discomfort can last weeks longer. Without medical assistance, most patients relapse to soothe the symptoms. Common symptoms include:

    • Drug Cravings
    • Large Pupils
    • Chills and Goose Bumps
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Body Aches
    • Severe Negative Moods and Agitation